For all you (us) architecture majors…

ecowatchorg:

How to Invest in Energy Efficiency to Combat Climate Change
Energy efficiency is estimated to be a multi-hundred-billion dollar investment opportunity in the U.S., but better policies are required to unlock broad-based financing from institutional investors, who together manage approximately $70 trillion in assets globally.
http://ecowatch.com/2013/invest-in-energy-efficency-combat-climate-change/

ecowatchorg:

How to Invest in Energy Efficiency to Combat Climate Change

Energy efficiency is estimated to be a multi-hundred-billion dollar investment opportunity in the U.S., but better policies are required to unlock broad-based financing from institutional investors, who together manage approximately $70 trillion in assets globally.

http://ecowatch.com/2013/invest-in-energy-efficency-combat-climate-change/

Architectural Wind is a product that attempts to blend the benefits of wind energy with an aesthetically pleasing design. I still don’t know why people complain about the “normal” ones anyway. I think they’re beautiful as it is. 

Architectural Wind is a product that attempts to blend the benefits of wind energy with an aesthetically pleasing design. I still don’t know why people complain about the “normal” ones anyway. I think they’re beautiful as it is. 

Because I love typography AND infographics. See original here.

Pretty sweet idea.

architizer:

Roads Cover 4.8 square miles of Manhattan

Howler and Yoon, winners of the Audi Urban Future Award image a NYC where roads become soccer fields and solar panels.

Pretty cool stuff.

thekhooll:

Books Shelf

Wood type project created by Melbourne-based designer Matt Innes

“When I was a kid, I thought a lot about what made me different from the other kids. I don’t think I was smarter than them and I certainly wasn’t more talented. And I definitely can’t claim I was a harder worker — I’ve never worked particularly hard, I’ve always just tried doing things I find fun. Instead, what I concluded was that I was more curious — but not because I had been born that way. If you watch little kids, they are intensely curious, always exploring and trying to figure out how things work. The problem is that school drives all that curiosity out. Instead of letting you explore things for yourself, it tells you that you have to read these particular books and answer these particular questions. And if you try to do something else instead, you’ll get in trouble. Very few people’s curiosity can survive that. But, due to some accident, mine did. I kept being curious and just followed my curiosity. First I got interested in computers, which led me to get interested in the Internet, which led me to get interested in building online news sites, which led me to get interested in standards (like RSS), which led me to get interested in copyright reform (since Creative Commons wanted to use similar standards). And on and on. Curiosity builds on itself — each new thing you learn about has all sorts of different parts and connections, which you then want to learn more about. Pretty soon you’re interested in more and more and more, until almost everything seems interesting. And when that’s the case, learning becomes really easy — you want to learn about almost everything, since it all seems really interesting. I’m convinced that the people we call smart are just people who somehow got a head start on this process. I fell like the only thing I’ve really done is followed my curiosity wherever it led, even if that meant crazy things like leaving school or not taking a “real” job. This isn’t easy — my parents are still upset with me that I dropped out of school — but it’s always worked for me.”

A GREAT way to look at life, and to be sure that you will enjoy it everyday.

- Aaron Swartz, in a previously unpublished email exchange with Ronaldo Lemos. (via fastcompany)